Monday, December 31, 2012

Curtiss XP-19

The Curtiss XP-19 was to have been a low-wing monoplane powered by the Wright V-1560-1 twelve-cylinder air cooled engine.

Curtiss XP-18

The Curtiss XP-18 was the designation given to a biplane fighter that was to have been powered by the Wright V-1560-1 twelve-cylinder air-cooled engine.

Curtiss XP-17

The Curtiss XP-17 was the designation given to the first P-1 when it was used to test a Curtiss Wright Tornado engine.

Curtiss XP-14

The Curtiss XP-14 was to have been a fighter based around the Curtiss H-1640 Chieftain 12-cylinder air cooled double-row inline engine.

Friday, December 28, 2012

Battle of Vouille (507)

The battle of Vouille (507) was a significant victory for Clovis I, king of the Franks, and allowed him to conquer Aquitaine, taking it from the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse

Siege of Vienne (c.500-501 AD)

The siege of Vienne (c.500-501 AD) was the final act in a Burgundian civil war that had briefly involved the Frankish king Clovis I, but that ended with the victory of Clovis's opponent Gundobar.

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Women Wartime Spies, Ann Kramer.

Women Wartime Spies, Ann Kramer.

A study of mainly Allied women spies during the two World Wars (plus Mata Hari), with interesting material on the La Dame Blanche spy network that operated in Belgium during the First World War and the role of women in British Intelligence in both wars (including the famous SOE operatives and the less glamorous but just as important work back in Britain).
[read full review]

Midget Ninja & Tactical Laxatives - Bizarre Warfare Through the Ages, Philip Sidnell.

Midget Ninja & Tactical Laxatives - Bizarre Warfare Through the Ages, Philip Sidnell.

 A look at some of the more unusual aspects of military history, from the oddest of weapons to the peculiar behaviour of military leaders, with enough variety to ensure that anything familiar is followed by something new.
[read full review]

Captured at the Imjin River, David Green.

Captured at the Imjin River, David Green.

A first-hand account of the experiences of a National Service soldier who served in Korea and was captured by the Chinese during the Battle of the Imjin River. This is a compelling story, and an invaluable account of life as a National Serviceman in Korea, and as a prisoner of the Chinese.
[read full review]

Friday, December 21, 2012

Rossano A Valley in Flames, Major Gordon Lett.

Rossano A Valley in Flames, Major Gordon Lett.

 A first-hand account of life with the Italian partisans during the Second World Word, written by the British commander of the International Brigade, a partisan group that operated in the Rossano valley, and that contained a mix of locals and escaped Prisoners of War and forced labourers. Also includes an account of the battalion's cooperation with an SAS mission that was dropped into the valley.
[read full review]

Birmingham Pals: 14th, 15th and 16th (Service) Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Terry Carter.

Birmingham Pals: 14th, 15th and 16th (Service) Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Terry Carter.

A high quality history of the three Birmingham battalions that formed part of Kitchener's 'New Army', fighting on the Somme, at Ypres, in Italy and during the crucial campaigns of 1918. Includes some excellent detailed accounts of trench raids, and gives a feel of how ghastly life in the Trenches could be
[read full review]

In Search of the Real Dad's Army, Stephen M. Cullen.

In Search of the Real Dad's Army, Stephen M. Cullen.

A wide ranging history of the Home Guard, covering topics from the weapons it was equipped with to the competing political theories that developed around it. Also covers the less familiar Northern Irish and Isle of Man Home Guards and has some fascinating sections on the later development of the Home Guard after the real danger of invasion had passed.
[read full review]

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Curtiss XP-11

The Curtiss XP-11 was the designation given to three Hawk biplanes that were to have been powered by the Curtiss Chieftain engine, but the failure of that engine meant that none were completed as P-11s.

Curtiss P-6 Hawk

The Curtiss P-6 Hawk was the most advanced version of the Hawk biplane fighter to serve with the USAAF, and differed from the earlier P-1 by using a Curtiss V-1570 Conqueror engine.

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Siege of Avignon (500)

The siege of Avignon (500) saw the Burgundian king Gundobar hold off a besieging Frankish army led by Clovis I for long enough to convince Clovis to offer peace terms.

Battle of the Ouche (500 AD)

The battle of the Ouche (500 AD) was a victory won by Clovis, king of the Franks, during an otherwise unsuccessful intervention in a Burgundian family dispute.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Battle of Tolbiac or Zulpich (496 AD)

The battle of Tolbiac or Zulpich (496 AD) might have been a victory won by Clovis and other Franks that prevented a westward movement of the Alemanni.

Battle of Soissons (486 AD)

The battle of Soissons (486 AD) was the first recorded victory won by Clovis I, king of the Franks, and saw him defeat Syagrius, the ruler of the last Roman enclave in northern Gaul.

Monday, December 17, 2012

Curtiss P-5 Superhawk

The Curtiss P-5 Superhawk was a version of the P-1 Hawk fitted with turbo-supercharged engines.

Curtiss P-3 Hawk

The Curtiss P-3 Hawk was a version of the Hawk fighter powered by the Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

Curtiss P-2 Hawk

The Curtiss P-2 Hawk was the designation given to five P-1s that were completed with the Curtiss V-1400 engine.

Friday, December 14, 2012

Curtiss P-1 Hawk

The Curtiss P-1 Hawk was the first in a family of taper-winged biplane fighters that served with the USAAC, the US Navy and that was exported in significant numbers, remaining in service for over a decade.

Curtiss PW-8

The Curtiss PW-8 was the first in a long series of Curtiss biplane fighters to be produced for the US Army and Navy between the two World Wars.

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Knight: The Warrior and the World of Chivalry, Robert Jones.

Knight: The Warrior and the World of Chivalry, Robert Jones.

A study of the Knight, from their humble origins in the 11th century through their dominance of society and battlefield in the high Middle Ages to their decline in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Looks at their arms and armour, role on the battlefield, place in society and eventual decline. An excellent overview of a complex issue.
[read full review]

Blood & Iron: Letters from the Western Front, Hugh Montagu Butterworth, ed. Jon Cooksey.

Blood & Iron: Letters from the Western Front, Hugh Montagu Butterworth, ed. Jon Cooksey.

A collection of letters written in the Ypres salient between May and September 1915. Built around the letters written by Hugh Montagu Butterworth during his time on the Western Front, supported by a detailed biography of Butterworth himself, a sports mad student who emigrated to New Zealand where he worked as a teacher. A fascinating selection of letters that give a glimpse into the brutality of trench warfare.
[read full review]

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War I, Wayne Stack.

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War I, Wayne Stack.

Looks at the recruitment, organisation, commanding officers, equipment and campaigns of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, which eventually involved some 40% of the male population of military age, a most impressive level of recruitment and that served in the Pacific, at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and on the Western Front. The author packs a great deal of information into the books forty-eight pages.
[read full review]

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Focke-Wulf Ta 254

The Focke-Wulf Ta 254 was a design for an improved version of the Ta 154 twin-engined fighter, with bigger wings to improve its service ceiling.

Loening XO-10

The Loening XO-10 was the designation given to the XOA-1A prototype when it was delivered to the US Army.

Loening OA-2

The Loening OA-2 amphibian was a version of the OA-1 that was powered by a Wright V-1460-1 Tornado engine.

Monday, December 10, 2012

Loening OA-1

The Loening OA-1 was an unusual two-man amphibian aircraft that served with the USAAC in the late 1920s.

Loening XHL-1

The Loening XHL-1 was an air ambulance based on the OL-8 observation amphibian.

Loening O2L

The Loening O2L was the prototype of an improved version of the Loening OL amphibian biplane.

Friday, December 07, 2012

Loening OL

The Loening OL was an unusual amphibian aircraft that used a single main float carried under the fuselage instead of the more standard flying boat hull.

Loening PA-1

The Loening PA-1 was the last fighter to be produced by the Loening company, and was an attempt to produce a successful biplane fighter after the failure of the Loening PW-2 monoplane.

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Posters of World War II, Allied and Axis Propaganda 1939-1945, Peter Darman.

Posters of World War II, Allied and Axis Propaganda 1939-1945, Peter Darman.

A beautifully produced look at the propaganda posters produced in seven of the main combatant nations of the Second World War, with a supporting text that explains who controlled poster production and useful individual captions. The text is good, but the brilliantly well printed posters are undoubtedly the stars of this very attractive book
[read full review]

Ask Forgiveness Not Permission, Howard Leedham.

Ask Forgiveness Not Permission, Howard Leedham.

A fascinating account of a successful covert operation funded by the US State Department using Pakistani Special Forces troops and American helicopters and for a year commanded by the author, a former member of British Special Forces. Operating on a financial shoe-string while US attention was focused on Iraq, the author achieved a great deal of success during his year.
[read full review]

George Washington, Mark Lardas.

George Washington, Mark Lardas.

One of the more successful entries in the command series, with an interesting emphasis on how Washington learnt from his early unsuccessful campaigns and on his overall strategic ideas during the War of Independence, focusing on the survival of his army rather than the defence of any particular city.
[read full review]

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Loening PW-2

The Loening PW-2 was a single seat monoplane fighter that was developed from the earlier M-8, and that was tested by the US Army but not accepted for production.

Loening M-8

The Loening M-8 was a monoplane fighter that was ordered into production in large numbers during the First World War, but that was eventually produced in significantly smaller numbers for the US Navy.

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

The Territorials 1908-1914: A Guide for Military and Family Historians, Ray Westlake.

The Territorials 1908-1914: A Guide for Military and Family Historians, Ray Westlake.

A reference work built around a complete list of Territorial units and the larger formations they were part of, and a gazetteer listing the units associated with every town and locality. Very useful for the dedicated researcher, but not aimed at the casual reader!
[read full review]

Assault Crossing: The River Seine 1944, Ken Ford.

Assault Crossing: The River Seine 1944, Ken Ford.

Looks at the 43rd (Wessex) Division's crossing of the Seine at Vernon, showing how chaotic and closely run an affair it was, despite being seen as part of the 'Great Swan', the rapid Allied advance across France after the breakout from Normandy. An interesting account of a battle found between two opposing infantry divisions.
[read full review]

The Strike Wings - Special Anti-Shipping Squadrons, 1942-45, Roy Conyers Nesbit.

The Strike Wings - Special Anti-Shipping Squadrons, 1942-45, Roy Conyers Nesbit.

A history of Coastal Command's Strike Wings, dedicated groups of anti-shipping squadrons that devastated German coastal shipping during the Second World War, but at a very high cost, written by someone who flew in the same role after the war and with a great use of eyewitness accounts and both Allied and German sources.
[read full review]

Monday, December 03, 2012

Battle of Tsukushi (7 July 1333)

The battle of Tsukushi (7 July 1333) was the final event in a complex plot against Hojo Hidetoki, the military governor of Kyushu, and saw him defeated by two of the three original plotters against him.

Genko War (1331-33)

The Genko War (1331-33) was a struggle between the supporters of the Emperor Go-Daigo and the Kamakura Shogunate which ended as an Imperial victory and led to the short-lived Kemmu restoration, the only period in which the Emperor held direct power between 1192 and the fall of the Tokugawa Shogunate in the nineteenth century

Friday, November 30, 2012

X/ XS Aircraft designations

The XS designation was used from 1946 to 1948 for experimental supersonic aircraft. In 1948 the letter changed to X for special test, and the existing XS craft became X craft.

1920-24 USAAS aircraft designation system

The short-lived 1920-24 USAAS aircraft designation system used one or two letter type designations, originally matched to a Type Number.

USAAC/ USAAF/ USAF aircraft designation systems

The US Air Force and its predecessors have used a series of designation systems to identify their aircraft, starting by using the manufacturer's own codes then adopting a system of type numbers and two letter codes in 1919-20. This was replaced by the more familiar basic mission system in 1924, with single letters for most aircraft types. This remained in use (with variants) until 1962, when it became the basis of the current Tri-service aircraft designation system.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

452nd Bombardment Group

The 452nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from February 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

401st Bombardment Group

The 401st Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from November 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

Monday, November 26, 2012

Albatros W.8

The Albatros W.8 was a patrol floatplane that was designed in 1918 and of which two or possibly three were produced.

Albatros W.5

The Albatros W.5 was an improved version of the Albatros W.3 torpedo bomber, but only five were built and the type wasn't accepted by the German navy.

Albatros W.4

The Albatros W.4 was a floatplane fighter based on the Albatros D.I and designed to intercept British flying boats and sea planes that were attacking German air stations on the North Sea coast.

Friday, November 23, 2012

Albatros W.3

The Albatros W.3 was a prototype for the Albatros W.5 torpedo bomber, and was largely based on the Albatros G.II bomber.

Albatros W.2

The Albatros W.2 was a floatplane version of the Albatros C.III, the most numerous entry in Albatros' series of armed two-seater scouts, but only a single prototype was built

Albatros W.1/ B.II-W

The Albatros W.1/ B.II-W was a floatplane version of the Albatros B.II, the most important of the company's unarmed two-man scouts.

Thursday, November 22, 2012

390th Bombardment Group

The 390th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that entered service just in time to take part in the raid on Regensburg on 17 August 1943 and that served with the Eighth Air Force for the rest of the Second World War

384th Bombardment Group

The 384th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from June 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, Steve Backer.

Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, Steve Backer.

A modelmaker's guide to the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, including a brief history of the ships, reviews of the best models and accessories, a showcase of some very impressive models, some useful plans of the two ships and an examination of the various camouflage schemes used and changes to the ship's appearances.
[read full review]

Nelson to Vanguard, Warship Design and Development 1923-1945, David K Brown.

Nelson to Vanguard, Warship Design and Development 1923-1945, David K Brown.

A study of the design of British warships during the period of the Naval Treaties and the Second World War, written by a post-war Deputy Chief Naval Architect. A fascinating and invaluable book that greatly benefits from the expert knowledge of the author.
[read full review]

Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers.

Battleground Gallipoli: Suvla August Offensive, Stephen Chambers.

A detailed history of the disastrous British landing at Sulva Bay in August 1915, an offensive that showed the British high command at almost its worst. Ends with three day-long walks around the battlefield area. All well supported by eyewitness accounts and contemporary photographs.
[read full review]

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Albatros J.II

The Albatros J.II was an improved version of the Albatros J.I ground attack aircraft.

Albatros J.I

The Albatros J.I was a ground attack aircraft somewhat inspired by the A.E.G. J.I but using the wings from the Albatros C.XII and constructed using the typical Albatros methods.

Monday, November 19, 2012

Siege of Kamakura (30 June-4 July 1333)

The siege of Kamakura (30 June-4 July 1333) was the final major battle of the Genko War (1331-33) and saw the army of Nitta Yoshisada capture the capital of the Kamakura Shogunate after a five-day long battle.

Battle of Bubaigawara (27-28 June 1333)

The two-day long battle of Bubaigawara (27-28 June 1333) saw the defenders of Kamakura miss an opportunity to defeat the pro-Imperial army of Nitta Yoshisada, thus ensuring that the fighting would move to the Shogunate's capital at Kamakura

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Peterborough Military History Fair

A bit of a change for us as we use the blog to plug someone else's activity - in this case the Peterborough Military History Fair, which will be held on 24-25 November from 10am to 4pm with free entry at Peterborough Museum
'Don’t miss your chance to see military history brought to life with costumed re-enactors, including Roman soldiers, Viking warriors, and soldiers from the Middle Ages. Visitors will have the chance to handle replica weapons and armour, plus there will be displays of militaria, wargames and military modelling – including rarely displayed items from the Museum’s own collections.'

Friday, November 16, 2012

Battle of Kumegawa (24 June 1333)

The battle of Kumegawa (24 June 1333) was the second of two battles in two days in the campaign that led to the capture of Kamakura and the fall of the Kamakura Shogunate (Genko War, 1331-33), and was won by the pro-Imperial forces of Nitta Yoshisada.

Battle of Kotesashi (23 June 1333)

The battle of Kotesashi (23 June 1333) was the first battle in the campaign that led to the capture of Kamakura and the final fall of the Kamakura Shogunate (Genko War, 1331-33). It was an inconclusive battle, and the fighting resuming on the following day.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Albatros C.XV

The Albatros C.XV was the last in the series of Albatros two-seat scouts, but although it entered production it arrived too late to see active service.

Albatros C.XIV

The Albatros C.XIV was smaller than previous Albatros two-seat scouts and became the prototype for the Albatros C.XV, which was ordered into full scale production.

Albatros C.XIII

The Albatros C.XIII was a close support aircraft developed from the D.Va fighter. It was basically a two-seat version of that aircraft, but with a 3ft wider wing span and a slight increase in length.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Battle of Rokuhara (20 June 1333)

The battle of Rokuhara (20 June 1333) was one of the decisive battles of the Genko War, and saw the Shogunate general Ashikaga Takauji turn on his former allies, side with the Emperor Go-Daigo and drive the forces of the Shogunate out of their headquarters in Rokuhara.

Battle of Koganawate (10 June 1333)

The battle of Koganawate (10 June 1333) was notable for the death of Nagoya Takaie, one leader of a Shogunate army that had been sent to Kyoto to secure control of the area around the Imperial capital and attack the Emperor Go-Daigo's new court at Funanoe.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

42nd Bombardment Group

The 42nd Bombardment Group was a B-25 Mitchell group of the Thirteenth Air Force that operated in the Solomons, New Guinea, Borneo, the Philippines, off the coast of China and over French Indochina.

2nd Bombardment Group

The 2nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 bomber group that operated with the Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Force, taking part in the invasion of Sicily, the campaign in Italy and the strategic bombing campaign across Europe.

Monday, November 12, 2012

Walking the Somme (Second Edition), Paul Reed.

Walking the Somme (Second Edition), Paul Reed.

Sixteen walks on the Somme battlefield, each with a discussion of the historical significance of the area, supported by a good selection of contemporary and modern photographs, useful sketch maps and contemporary trench maps. Produced twenty years after the first edition, the author's knowledge of the battlefield shines through.
[read full review]

Wake Island 1941, Jim Moran.

Wake Island 1941, Jim Moran.

A well-illustrated look at the Japanese siege of Wake Island in 1941, which involved two amphibious assaults and repeated aerial assaults, and saw the only unsuccessful amphibious invasion of the Second World War when the first Japanese attack on the island was defeated. Well supported by some excellent maps, and with a clear, well written text.
[read full review]

Iowa Class Battleships, Lester Abbey.

Iowa Class Battleships, Lester Abbey.

A modeller's guide to the four ships of the Iowa class, the best American battleships and the longest serving capital ships of the modern era. Includes a history of the ships and their designs, a section of model reviews, a modellers showcase showing some very impressive models, and a section on the changing appearance of these ships over time.
[read full review]

Friday, November 09, 2012

Albatros C.XII

The Albatros C.XII saw the first major change in the configuration of the Albatros two-seater scouts and combined features from the previous C.XII and their later D-class single seat fighters, in particular the D.V.

Albatros C.X

The Albatros C.X was the last in the series of two-seat Albatros scouts to use the basic configuration inherited from the unarmed B-class scouts, but had a more powerful engine and was a significantly larger aircraft than earlier Albatros C-class scouts.

Albatros C.IX

The Albatros C.IX was a design for a close support aircraft of which only three were built.

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Battle of Funanoe (13 May 1333)

The battle of Funanoe (13 May 1333) was an unsuccessful attempt by the exiled emperor Go-Daigo's jailor to recapture the emperor after he had escaped from exile on Oki, an island to the north-west of Honshu.

Battle of the Third Day of the Fourth Month (17 May 1333)

The battle of the Third Day of the Fourth Month (17 May 1333) was a second failed attempt to take Kyoto made by the pro-Imperial leader Akamatsu Norimura.

Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Battle of Yamazaki (29 April 1333)

The battle of Yamazaki (29 April 1333) saw a force from the Rokuhara garrison of Kyoto fail to drive away a pro-Imperial army under Akamatsu Norimura that was threatening to cut off supplies to the city.

Battle of the Twelfth Day of the Third Month (26 April 1333)

The battle of the Twelfth Day of the Third Month (26 April 1333) was an unsuccessful attempt by the pro-Imperial Akamatsu Norimura to try and defeat the Shogunate's garrison in Kyoto

Monday, November 05, 2012

93rd Bombardment Wing

The 93rd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Unit that entered combat just before D-Day and supported the Allied invasion before taking part in the strategic bombing campaign for the rest of the war.

20th Bombardment Wing

The 20th Bombardment Wing was a B-24 Liberator Wing of the Eighth Air Force which took part in the strategic bombing campaign from December 1943 until April 1945.

Friday, November 02, 2012

Albatros C.VIII N

The Albatros C.VIII N was a night bomber developed in 1917 but that never entered service.

Albatros C.VII

The Albatros C.VII was similar to the C.V, but was powered by a Benz engine that was produced in much larger numbers than the interim Mercedes engine used on the C.V.

Thursday, November 01, 2012

The World at War, Taylor Downing.

The World at War, Taylor Downing.

Looks at the making of the excellent ITV documentary series the World at War, examining the environment at ITV that allowed such an ambitious series to be made, the background of the team behind the series, the historical approach and use of sources and the decisions that went into the making of each of the twenty six episodes.
[read full review]

Borodino 1812, Napoleon's Great Gamble, Philip Haythornthwaite.

Borodino 1812, Napoleon's Great Gamble, Philip Haythornthwaite.

 Two thirds a history of the 1812 campaign and one third an account of the battle of Borodino itself, this is a successful shorter history of Napoleon's doomed invasion of Russia. Gives a clearer view of a battle than is sometimes the case in longer works
[read full review]

He Who Dared and Died: The Life and Death of an SAS Original, Sergeant Chris O'Dowd MM, Gearóid O'Dowd.

He Who Dared and Died: The Life and Death of an SAS Original, Sergeant Chris O'Dowd MM, Gearóid O'Dowd.

The story of an Irish volunteer in the British Army who became an early member of the SAS and fought with them in North Africa and on Sicily before being killed during the invasion of Italy.
[read full review]

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Albatros C.VI

The Albatros C.VI was similar to the C.III and the contemporary C.V, but was powered by the 180hp Argus As.III engine.

Albatros C.V

The Albatros C.V was powered by a 220hp Mercedes D.IV engine and because of the limited production of the engine only appeared in small numbers.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

94th Bombardment Wing

The 94th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe from December 1943 until April 1945.

92nd Bombardment Wing

The 92nd Bombardment Wing went through two incarnations during the Second World War, both as heavy bomber wings of the Eighth Air Force.

Monday, October 29, 2012

Battle of Segawa (25 April 1333)

The battle of Segawa (25 April 1333) was the last real success during the Imperial loyalist Akamatsu Norimura's attempt to capture Kyoto.

Battle of Sakabe (24 April 1333)

The battle of Sakabe (24 April 1333) was a minor skirmish in which the Imperial loyalist Akamatsu Norimura was nearly captured by the forces of the Shogunate.

Friday, October 26, 2012

Images of War: Final Days of the Reich, Ian Baxter.

Images of War: Final Days of the Reich, Ian Baxter.

Contains some interesting pictures of the Germany army of 1945, with a mix of pictures of late-war military equipment and the troops themselves, many obviously posed but some that give a real feel of an army in collapse. Let down somewhat by the quality of the text, but still of interest.
 [read full review]

Allies at Dieppe: 4 Commando and the US Rangers, Will Fowler.

Allies at Dieppe: 4 Commando and the US Rangers, Will Fowler.

A study of the 4 Commando and US Ranger attack on the gun battery at Le Mesnil, west of Dieppe, one of the few successes of the otherwise disastrous 1942 attack on Dieppe. An interesting use of the Kindle format to produce a longer text that is normal for Osprey, with extensive use of eyewitness accounts of the raid.
[read full review]

An Incomparable Project, T.E. Crowdy.

An Incomparable Project, T.E. Crowdy.

Four essays that expand on Incomparable, a history of the 9th Light Infantry Regiment by the same author. Looks at the earliest version of the regiment of the Seven Years War, its immediate precursor, its first combat after the Revolution and its time as the 9th demi-brigade.
[read full review]

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Medieval Warfare Vol II Issue 4: The Steppe warrior defeated: Otto I versus the Magyars.

Medieval Warfare Vol II Issue 4: The Steppe warrior defeated: Otto I versus the Magyars.

Combines an overview of the Magyar's impact on early Medieval Europe with an examination of their early successes and the sequence of German victories that ended their raids and indirectly led to the foundation of the Hungarian kingdom. Also looks at Glyn Dwr in Wales, the fortifications of the Bosporus and Dardanelles and the Byzantine Empire's attitude to the Armenians.
[read full review]

Medieval Warfare Vol II Issue 3: Pikes, bows and war wagons: The rebirth of infantry.

Medieval Warfare Vol II Issue 3: Pikes, bows and war wagons: The rebirth of infantry.

Focuses on the revival of infantry in the late middle ages, a trend that ended a period where the mounted knight had dominated warfare, and that possibly played a major part in changes in wider society. Also looks at the diseases of siege warfare, fortifications of Tunisia and the Mongol invasion of the Khwarazmian Empire.
[read full review]

Medieval Warfare Vol 1 Issue 4: Mercenaries and mighty warlords: The Normans in the Mediterranean.

Medieval Warfare Vol 1 Issue 4: Mercenaries and mighty warlords: The Normans in the Mediterranean.

Focuses on the Norman conquests in southern Italy and Sicily, a period that saw the Hauteville family dominate the central Mediterranean and even conquer parts of North Africa. Also looks at the medieval fire arrow, the fate of English archers after the battle of Morat, head wounds and the work of a duelling master.
[read full review]

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

41st Bombardment Wing

The 41st Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Air Force, and operated three B-17 groups as part of the strategic bombing force from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

40th Bombardment Wing

The 40th Bombardment Wing formed part of the 1st Air Division of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Hitler's Final Fortress: Breslau 1945, Richard Hargreaves.

Hitler's Final Fortress: Breslau 1945, Richard Hargreaves.

An account of the longest siege of any German city during 1945, the four month siege of Breslau, which ended four days after the fall of Berlin. Gives a clear picture of the desperate struggle for the city, the ghastly conditions within the besieged 'fortress' and the heavy cost suffered by the Soviet and Polish troops attacking the city.
[read full review]

Caporetto and the Isonzo Campaign, The Italian Front 1915-1918, John Macdonald with Zeljko Cimprié.

Caporetto and the Isonzo Campaign, The Italian Front 1915-1918, John Macdonald with Zeljko Cimprié.

An excellent study of the First World War on the Italian front, focusing on the twelve battles of the Isonzo, one of the most costly campaigns of the entire war. A good background to the campaign is followed by useful accounts of each of the battles, something quite difficult to find.
[read full review]

Fighting at Sea in the Eighteenth Century: The Art of Sailing Warfare, Sam Willis.

Fighting at Sea in the Eighteenth Century: The Art of Sailing Warfare, Sam Willis.

An analysis of the practical aspects of war at sea in an elongated Eighteenth Century, looking at the basics of fighting under sail, command with limited communication, the impact of damage on tactics, the unwritten rules that governed naval commanders and how all of these elements combined in small and large scale naval engagements.
[read full review]

Monday, October 22, 2012

Battle of Maya (27 March 1333)

The battle of Maya (27 March 1333) was the first of a series of victories won by Akamatsu Norimura, a supporter of the Emperor Go-Daigo, during an unsuccessful attempt to capture Kyoto.

Battle of Hoshigaoka (28 January 1333)

The battle of Hoshigaoka (28 January 1333) saw the revolt against the Shogunate spread onto Shikoku Island (Genko War, 1331-33).

Friday, October 19, 2012

Siege of Chihaya (March-22 June 1333)

The siege of Chihaya (March-22 June 1333) was the turning point in the Genko War (1331-33). The Shogunate's failure to capture the castle meant that their main army was pinned down, encouraged pro-Imperial revolts around Japan and forced them to commit ever more troops to the fighting.

Siege of Yoshino Castle (February 1333)

The siege of Yoshino Castle (February 1333) saw a large Bakufu army capture the castle after an eight day siege, forcing Prince Norinaga to flee to safety.

Thursday, October 18, 2012

447th Bombardment Group

The 447th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force that took part in the campaign to support the D-Day landings before joining the full strategic bombing campaign.

100th Bombardment Group

The 100th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign, supporting the armies on the continent after D-Day and was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palms.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

96th Bombardment Group

The 96th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe and also supported the Allied armies fighting on the continent after D-Day.

95th Bombardment Group

The 95th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe as well as supporting the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Siege of Akasaka (18 February-c.14 March 1333)

The siege of Akasaka (18 February-c.14 March 1333) was one of the few successes won by a massive Bakufu army at the start of the last year of the Genko War (1331-33).

Battle of the Yodo River (14 June 1332)

The battle of the Yodo River (14 June 1332) was a victory won by Kusunoki Masashige over the forces of the Shogunate at the Yodo River (modern Osaka).

Monday, October 15, 2012

Tracing Your Family History on the Internet, Chris Paton.

Tracing Your Family History on the Internet, Chris Paton.

A useful guide to the most valuable websites for researchers in family history, with an emphasis on those sites that are likely to be around for some time. Particularly good on local and regional societies and their websites, with a county-by-county guide to local resources.
[read full review]

Wellington in the Peninsula, Jac Weller.

Wellington in the Peninsula, Jac Weller.

 A single volume history of the British involvement in the Peninsula War, focusing on Wellington's campaigns in Spain, but also including Sir John Moore at Corunna, the costly battle of Albuera and Wellington's campaign in France in 1814. Despite being fifty years old the book has aged well and is still a useful overview of the topic.
[read full review]

Lady's Men: The Story of World War II's Mystery Bomber and her Crew, Mario Martinez.

Lady's Men: The Story of World War II's Mystery Bomber and her Crew, Mario Martinez.

Partly the story of a doomed bomber crew and partly the tale of the detective work that saw their aircraft rediscovered and solved the mystery of the crew's fate. A fascinating if inevitably rather downbeat story.
[read full review]

Friday, October 12, 2012

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Albatros C.IV

The Albatros C.IV was an experimental aircraft produced to test a new wing and a revised arrangement of the aircrew.

Albatros C.III

The Albatros C.III was the most numerous of the Albatros two-seater scouts and after a useful front line career went on to serve in even larger numbers as a trainer.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

388th Bombardment Group

The 388th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe, as well as flying a number of tactical missions to support the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

385th Bombardment Group

The 385th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

The capture of Akasaki Castle (28 April 1332) was achieved by a surprise attack and saw Kusunoki Masashige recapture his own castle at Akasaka, which had fallen to the forces of the Shogunate in the previous year (Seige of Akasaka, November 1331).

Siege of Akasaki (c.31 October-20 November 1331)

The siege of Akasaki (c.31 October-20 November 1331) saw the forces of the Shogunate attack and capture the castle of Kusunoki Masashige, a supporter of the Emperor Go-Daigo, although Kusunoki escaped and continued the fight from nearby mountains.

Monday, October 08, 2012

Lost Legion Rediscovered: The Mystery of the Theban Legion, Donald O'Reilly.

Lost Legion Rediscovered: The Mystery of the Theban Legion, Donald O'Reilly.

An attempt to find an historical basis for the story of a martyred legion that was first mentioned in an account written by the Bishop of Lyon in 383 after the discovery of a mass grave. Cleverly argued, with the evidence examined in some detail.
[read full review]

The Fatal Decisions: First Hand Accounts by Hitler's Generals, ed. William Richardson and Seymour Freidlin.

The Fatal Decisions: First Hand Accounts by Hitler's Generals, ed. William Richardson and Seymour Freidlin.

Six accounts written by German army generals ten years after the end of the Second World War presenting their view of a series of the main events of the war, from the Battle of Britain to the Battle of the Bulge via Moscow, Stalingrad, El Alamein and D-Day.
[read full review]

Surgeon at Arms: Parachuting into Arnhem with the First Airborne, Lipmann Kessel.

Surgeon at Arms: Parachuting into Arnhem with the First Airborne, Lipmann Kessel.

The memoirs of a surgeon who parachuted into Arnhem, operated in a hospital that was soon occupied by the Germans, and who then escaped from captivity and spent weeks with the Dutch underground making a series of attempts to cross the front line.
[read full review]

Friday, October 05, 2012

Siege of Kasagi (11 October-8 November 1331)

The siege of Kasagi (11 October-8 November 1331) saw the forces of the Kamakura Shogunate capture the Emperor Go-Daigo's refuse at Kasagi, a success that for a time appeared to have crushed the Imperial cause (Genko War, 1331-33).

Battle of Karasaki Beach (October 1331)

The battle of Karasaki Beach (October 1331) was the first battle of the Genko War (1331-33), and saw the Monastic supports of the Emperor Go-Daigo defeat a cavalry force sent to capture him.

Thursday, October 04, 2012

4th Bombardment Wing

The 4th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force, and controlled a third of the bomber force until the formation of Bombardment Divisions. It took part in the strategic bombing campaign and also performed tactical bombing missions in support of the D-Day landings and the campaign that followed.

2nd Bombardment Wing

The 2nd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bombardment unit of the Eighth Air Force, and its B-24 Liberators took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe, supported the fighting after D-Day and were briefly detached to the Mediterranean.

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Albatros C.II Gitterschwanz (lattice tail)

The Albatros C.II Gitterschwanz (lattice tail) was an experimental pusher aircraft built with wings and undercarriage of the Albatros C.I.

Albatros C.I

The Albatros C.I was the first in a series of armed Albatros scout aircraft that were a mainstay of the German air force from 1915 until the end of 1917.

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Convention of Schönbrünn (15 December 1805)

The Convention of Schönbrünn (15 December 1805) was an alliance between Prussia and France forced on the Prussians in the aftermath of Napoleon's great victory at Austerlitz.

Combat of Ostrolenka (16 February 1807)

The combat of Ostrolenka (16 February 1807) was a minor French victory won on the right flank of their long front in Poland, and ended a Russian attempt to push the French back in the south.

Monday, October 01, 2012

381st Bombardment Group

The 381st Bombardment Group was a B-17 group in the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

94th Bombardment Group

The 94th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the US Strategic campaign over Germany from 1943 to the end of the war in Europe as well as directly supporting the D-Day landings and the land campaign in Europe.

Friday, September 28, 2012

Mitsubishi Army Type Ko 1 Trainer

The Mitsubishi Army Type Ko 1 Trainer was a licence-built version of the Nieuport 81-E2, one of the standard training aircraft in the early expansion of Japanese Army aviation.

Mitsubishi Army Type Ki 1 Trainer

The Mitsubishi Army Type Ki 1 Trainer was a licence-built version of the Hanriot HD-14 that served as the main basic trainer in the Japanese Army from the mid-1920s until the mid-1930s.

Thursday, September 27, 2012

No.454 Squadron, RAAF

No.454 Squadron, RAAF, was a medium bomber squadron that flew maritime patrols in the Eastern Mediterranean in 1943-44 before joining the Desert Air Force in Italy where it acted as a ground attack unit for the rest of the war.

No.453 Squadron, RAAF

No.453 Squadron, RAAF, went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a short-lived fighter squadron swept up in the Japanese invasions of Malaya, Sumatra and Java, and second as a fighter squadron based in Britain.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

My Seventy-Five, The Journal of a French Gunner August-September 1914, Paul Lintier.

My Seventy-Five, The Journal of a French Gunner August-September 1914, Paul Lintier.

The diary of a talented young French author covering the first two months of the First World War, covering mobilisation, the advance to the French frontier and the long retreat, the counter-attack on the Marne and the eventual stalemate on the Aisne. A fascinating view of one of the most important campaigns of the First World War.

[read full review]

American Missiles 1962 to the Present Day, The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide, Brian D. Nicklas.

American Missiles 1962 to the Present Day, The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide, Brian D. Nicklas.

A spotter's guide to American missiles since the introduction of the 'M for Missiles' designation in 1962. Most get a single page, with one or more photos, basic specifications and a paragraph or two of text. Useful both as an overview of missile development over the last half century and for anyone who needs to identify a particular missile.

[read full review]

The Battle of Maida 1806, Fifteen Minutes of Glory, Richard Hopton.

The Battle of Maida 1806, Fifteen Minutes of Glory, Richard Hopton.

A detailed account of the first significant victory won by the British army against the troops of Napoleonic France, fought in southern Italy after the failure of the Third Coalition. An excellent account of the background to the battle, the fighting at Maida, the aftermath and its significance within the wider Napoleonic War.
[read full review]

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Monday, September 24, 2012

379th Bombardment Group

The 379th Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 Groups to join the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

351st Bombardment Group

The 351st Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 groups to join the Eighth Air Force, and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

The British Field Marshals 1736-1997: A Biographical Dictionary, T A Heathcote.

The British Field Marshals 1736-1997: A Biographical Dictionary, T A Heathcote.

A biographical dictionary looking at the first 138 British Field Marshals, a mixed group containing military leaders of varying quality and members of the British and foreign royal families. A useful reference work that gives us an idea of just how varied a group of people the British Field Marshals actually were.
[read full review]

The Art of War, Sun Tzu.

The Art of War, Sun Tzu.

A beautifully presented edition of one of the classics of military thought. Printed on high quality paper (it shows), and bound using a traditional Chinese method which involves sewing the pages together using holes punched close to the inner edge. Has the Chinese text on one page with the English translation facing it.
[read full review]

Charging against Wellington: The French Cavalry in the Peninsular War 1807-1814, Robert Burnham.

Charging against Wellington: The French Cavalry in the Peninsular War 1807-1814, Robert Burnham.

A valuable reference book that covers the organisation of the French cavalry, looking at changes in structure and command, biographies of eighty French cavalry generals and brief histories of each cavalry regiment to serve with the French in Spain and Portugal.
[read full review]

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

306th Bombardment Group

The 306th Bombardment Group was an early B-17 group within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing offensive from its early stages in 1942 until the end of the war in Europe.

305th Bombardment Group

The 305th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Battle of Eylau (8 February 1807)

The battle of Eylau (8 February 1807) was the first major setback suffered by Napoleon on the battlefield and was a costly inconclusive battle fought in the snow in East Prussia.

Combat of Hof (6 February 1807)

The combat of Hof (6 February 1807) was a rearguard action fought between the Russian rearguard under Barclay de Tolly and the advancing French during the Russian retreat before the battle of Eylau.

Friday, September 14, 2012

Wingate Pasha, R J M Pugh.

Wingate Pasha, R J M Pugh.

A biography of an important figure in the British Empire, the ruler of the Sudan for twenty years. Wingate was also involved in the defeat of the Dervishes and played a major part in the success of the Arab Revolt of the First World War, and is an interesting figure.
read full review

The Campaigns for Vicksburg, 1862-1863, Kevin J. Dougherty.

The Campaigns for Vicksburg, 1862-1863, Kevin J. Dougherty.

An unusual approach to military history, this book looks at the leadership lessons that can be learnt from the successful Union attempts to capture Vicksburg, one of the key battles of the American Civil War. Organised into case studies that combine a particular element of the battle with an aspect of leadership.
[read full review]

Isandlwana, How the Zulus Humbled the British Empire, Adrian Greaves.

Isandlwana, How the Zulus Humbled the British Empire, Adrian Greaves.

An excellent examination of this famous battle and the campaign that led up to it, written by someone with a detailed knowledge of the battlefield and surrounding areas. Uses a wide range of contemporary sources to paint an accurate picture of this battle and the Zulu achievements and the British mistakes that led to the great Zulu victory.
[read full review]

Thursday, September 13, 2012

303rd Bombardment Group

The 303rd Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign from 1942 until the end of the war in Europe.

301st Bombardment Group

The 301st Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that entered combat with the Eighth Air Force in Britain but was soon moved to the Mediterreanean, where it operated from North Africa and then Italy.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

97th Bombardment Group

The 97th Bombardment Group took part in the first Eighth Air Force heavy bomber mission of the Second World War, but soon afterwards was transfered to the Mediterranean, where it spent the rest of the war, ending up in Italy

92nd Bombardment Group

The 92nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that formed part of the US Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign as well as supporting the D-Day invasions, Operation Market Garden, the crossing of the Rhine and taking part in the Battle of the Bulge.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Battle of Jonkowo (3 February 1807)

The battle of Jonkowo (3 February 1807) was an inconclusive battle that allowed the Russians to escape from a trap set for them by Napoleon after the Russians attempted to attack the left flank of the French army in Prussia.

Combat of Mohrungen (25 January 1807)

The combat of Mohrungen (25 January 1807) saw Bernadotte's corps defeat part of a Russian army that was attempting to attack the isolated left wing of Napoleon's army in Poland in the winter of 1806-7.

Monday, September 10, 2012

Friday, September 07, 2012

Treaty of Potsdam (3 November 1805)

The Treaty of Potsdam (3 November 1805) was an agreement between Prussia and Russia in which the Prussians agreed to join the Third Coalition if Napoleon didn't agree to peace terms.

Marshal Pierre-François-Charles Augereau (1757-1816)

Marshal Pierre-François-Charles Augereau (1757-1816) was a successful Revolutionary general and one of Napoleon's best generals in Italy in 1796 but his later military career was undistinguished, and his actions in 1814 and 1815 cost him his reputation and his titles.

Thursday, September 06, 2012

91st Bombardment Group

The 91st Bombardment Group was a heavy bomber group equipped with the B-17 and that formed part of the Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force from November 1942 until the end of the Second War World.

1st Bombardment Wing

The 1st Bombardment Wing formed part of the US Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force and took part in the daylight bombing campaign over Germany and occupied Europe from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

SAS Trooper - Charlie Radford's Operations in Enemy Occupied France and Italy, Charlie Radford, ed. Francis Mackay.

SAS Trooper - Charlie Radford's Operations in Enemy Occupied France and Italy, Charlie Radford, ed. Francis Mackay.

Follows the military career of a pre-war army apprentice through his time as a sapper and in the SAS, where he fought behind German lines in France and took part in Operation Cold Comfort, one of the less successful SAS missions in Italy.
[read full review]

The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force, David Hobbs.

The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force, David Hobbs.

A history of the most powerful fleet in British naval history, tracing its rapid development from shaky early days in the Indian ocean to its involvement in the invasion of Okinawa and operations alongside the Americans off the coast of Japan.
[read full review]

Missing, Believed Killed: Casualty Policy and the Missing Research and Enquiry Service 1939-1952, Stuart Hadaway.

Missing, Believed Killed: Casualty Policy and the Missing Research and Enquiry Service 1939-1952, Stuart Hadaway.

A history of the effort to track down every member of the RAF lost in combat during the Second World War, one of the largest detective missions ever undertaken, including a large number of example cases.
 [read full review]

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Mitsubishi Experimental Taka-type Carrier Fighter (1MF9)

The Mitsubishi Experimental Taka-type Carrier Fighter (1MF9) was the first carrier fighter to be designed by a Japanese engineer, but failed to gain a production order.

Mitsubishi Navy Type 10 Carrier Fighter (1MF1 to 1MF5)

The Mitsubishi Navy Type 10 Carrier Fighter (1MF1 to 1MF5) was the first purpose-built carrier fighter in the world and was designed for Mitsubishi by a British team led by Herbert Smith, previously a senior engineer at Sopwith.

Monday, September 03, 2012

Battle of Golymin (26 December 1806)

The battle of Golymin (26 December 1806) was one of two inconclusive battles fought between French and Russian armies in the Prussian partition of Poland on the same night.

Battle of Pultusk (26 December 1806)

The battle of Pultusk (26 December 1806) was one of two inconclusive battles fought on the same day between French and Russian forces, and was one of the first hints that the Russians might be a difficult opponent for Napoleon.

Friday, August 31, 2012

Aichi AB-3 Experimental Single-Seat Reconnaissance Seaplane

The Aichi AB-3 Experimental Single-Seat Reconnaissance Seaplane was designed for use on a Chinese light cruiser, but despite being a successful design wasn't accepted by the Chinese.

Aichi AB-2 Experimental Catapult-Launched Reconnaissance Seaplane

The Aichi AB-2 Experimental Catapult-Launched Reconnaissance Seaplane was the first aircraft of its type to have been designed in Japan without any foreign assistance, but the aircraft wasn't a success and only two prototypes were built.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Combat of Biezun (23 December 1806)

The combat of Biezun (23 December 1806) saw the defeat of a Prussian attempt to recapture Biezun on the Ukra River, a key position that connected the Prussians to their Russian allies.

Combat of Czarnowo (23 December 1806)

The combat of Czarnowo (23 December 1806) saw the French establish a bridgehead on the east bank of the River Ukra, at the point where it flows into the River Bug (War of the Fourth Coalition).

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

No.94 Squadron, RAAF

No.94 Squadron, RAAF, was a Mosquito fighter-bomber squadron formed in Australian in May 1945 but that never saw action.

No.87 Squadron, RAAF

No.87 Squadron, RAAF, was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that operated over the Dutch East Indies, Timor, Java, Borneo and even the Philippines.

No.33 Squadron (RAAF)

No.33 Squadron (RAAF) was a transport squadron that served in the south-west Pacific from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Siege of Trinacie (c.440 BC)

The siege of Trinacie (c.440 BC) was one of the final stages in the Greek conquest of the Sicels, the native inhabitants of eastern Sicily.

Battle of the Himera River (446 BC)

The battle of the Himera River (446 BC) was a clash between the Greek cities of Syracuse and Akragas, triggered by the return to Sicily of the Sicel leader Ducetius

Monday, August 27, 2012

The Great Chevauchée, John of Gaunt's Raid on France, 1373, David Nicolle.

The Great Chevauchée, John of Gaunt's Raid on France, 1373, David Nicolle.

 An account of an unsuccessful English raid that crossed France from Calais to Bordeaux, lost one third of its strength and was probably lucky to survive. This is a good account of an important but often neglected incident that played a part in the decline of the English position in France.
[read full review]

El Alamein, The Battle that Turned the Tide of the Second World War, Bryn Hammond.

El Alamein, The Battle that Turned the Tide of the Second World War, Bryn Hammond.

Looks at the four months the Allies and Axis armies spent fighting over the Alamein position, including Rommel's two attacks on the Allied positions and the eventual Allied victory at the Second Battle of Alamein.
[read full review]

Small Arms 1914-1945, Michael E. Haskew.

Small Arms 1914-1945, Michael E. Haskew.

A largely chronological look at the development of small arms during the two World Wars, organised into chapters based on different parts of the conflict, subdivided by nations or major battles. Makes it easier to compare the weapons in use by the different nations at any one time.
 [read full review]

Friday, August 24, 2012

Mitsubishi Army Type 92 Reconnaissance Aircraft (2MR8)

The Mitsubishi Army Type 92 Reconnaissance Aircraft (2MR8) was a parasol wing aircraft that became the first Japanese military aircraft to use an engine entirely designed and built in Japan.

Mitsubishi Army Type 87 Light Bomber (2MB1)

The Mitsubishi Army Type 87 Light Bomber (2MB1) was a version of the Navy Type 13 Carrier Attack Aircraft that saw service with the Japanese army early in the conflict in Manchuria.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

No.24 (City of Adelaide) Squadron, RAAF

No.24 (City of Adelaide) Squadron, RAAF, took part in the defence of Rabaul in 1941-42, where it suffered heavy losses of aircraft. After escaping to Australia the reinforced squadron took part in the fighting on New Guinea. It was then reformed as a heavy bomber squadron in Australia and taking part in the campaigns on New Guinea, in the Dutch East Indies and on Borneo.

No.5 Squadron, RAAF

No.5 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that served on Bougainville, New Britain and New Guinea from late in 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.4 Squadron, RAAF

No.4 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that used Commonwealth Wirraway and Boomerang aircraft in support of the troops fighting on New Guinea and Borneo.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Roman Warships, Michael Pitassi.

Roman Warships, Michael Pitassi.

Takes an interesting approach to the problem of reconstructing Roman warships, beginning with artistic and literary sources, moving onto a detailed plan based on the known limits of rowers and ending by constructing accurate models to see if the plan actually works in practise. The results are fascinating and his arguments very convincing.
[read full review]

Norman Naval Operations in the Mediterranean, Charles D. Stanton.

Norman Naval Operations in the Mediterranean, Charles D. Stanton.

Based around a narrative history of the Norman's maritime empire in the central Mediterranean, this interesting book looks at the naval operations involved in the Norman conquest of a kingdom in southern Italy and Sicily, in the maintenance of that kingdom and during increasingly grandiose campaigns in the eastern Mediterranean.
[read full review]

Home before the Leaves Fall, Ian Senior.

Home before the Leaves Fall, Ian Senior.

Looks at the fighting in France in 1914 from the outbreak of war to the defeat of the German invasion at the battle of the Marne. Focuses mainly on the role of the German and French armies in the fighting, the two side's plans, the way in which they unfolded and unravelled after the fighting began and the reactions of Joffre and Moltke.
[read full review]

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Siege of Magdeburg (20 October-11 November 1806)

The siege of Magdeburg (20 October-11 November 1806) came in the aftermath of the twin French victories at Jena and Auerstädt, and the surrender of the city marked the end of significant Prussian resistance in 1806.

Battle of Halle (17 October 1806)

The battle of Halle (17 October 1806) was a French victory over the intact Prussian reserve army in the aftermath of the battles of Jena and Auerstädt.

Monday, August 20, 2012

Battle of Motyum (451 BC)

The battle of Motyum (451 BC) was the most important battlefield victory won by the Sicel leader Ducetius, but he was defeated at Nomae in the following year and forced into exile.

Siege of Motyum (451 BC)

The siege of Motyum (451 BC) was the first known attempt by the Sicel leader Ducetius to conquer an area held by one of the major Greek powers of Sicily, and led to his greatest victory over the Greeks at the battle of Motyum.

Friday, August 17, 2012

No.452 Squadron, RAAF

No.452 Squadron, RAAF, was formed in the United Kingdom where it served as a fighter squadron during 1941 and the first part of 1942. It then moved to Australia to face the Japanese, before taking part in the re-conquest of the Dutch East Indies and Borneo.

No.451 Squadron, RAAF

No.451 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron that provided air cover over Syria, Cyprus and the Nile Delta in 1942-43, and took part in the invasion of Southern France before moving to the UK where it spent 1945 flying a mix of bomber-escort and fighter-bomber missions.

No.450 Squadron, RAAF

No.450 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron during the fighting in Syria in 1941 and in North Africa before becoming a fighter-bomber squadron for the campaigns in Sicily and Italy.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Battle of Jena (14 October 1806)

The battle of Jena (14 October 1806) was one of two simultaneous battles won by the French on the same day and saw Napoleon with most of the Grand Armée defeat the Prussian flank guard at Jena while Marshal Davout defeated the main Prussian force further north at Auerstädt.

Battle of Saalfeld (10 October 1806)

The battle of Saalfeld (10 October 1806) was the first major clash during the War of the Fourth Coalition and saw a French column defeat a smaller Prussian force under Prince Louis Ferdinand

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

The Battle for Tinian, Nathan N. Prefer.

The Battle for Tinian, Nathan N. Prefer.

 A study of an opposed landing on a Pacific island where the American worked nearly perfectly, Japanese opposition ended comparatively quickly and with a lower cost than on most of the island invasions. Prefer looks at the reasons for the American success, the course of the battle and the lessons that could have been learnt from the success on Tinian.
[read full review]

1781: The Decisive Year of the Revolutionary War, Robert L. Tonsetic.

1781: The Decisive Year of the Revolutionary War, Robert L. Tonsetic.

Starts with the American cause at a low ebb over the winter of 1780-1 and traces its revival and triumph during 1781, the year that saw the failure of the British southern strategy and the dramatic surrender of Cornwallis's army at Yorktown, the defeat that effectively ended any chance of British success.
[read full review]

Fromelles 1916: No Finer Courage, the Loss of an English Village, Michael Senior.

Fromelles 1916: No Finer Courage, the Loss of an English Village, Michael Senior.

A look the impact of the First World War on the Buckinghamshire village of The Lee, and the tragic losses suffered by that village during the disastrous attack on Fromelles in July 1916.
read full review

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

No.3 Squadron (RAAF)

No.3 Squadron (RAAF) was originally a reconnaissance unit, but in 1941 it became a fighter squadron and served in that role in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, ending the war as a ground attack unit.

No.2 Squadron (RAAF)

No.2 Squadron (RAAF) fought against the Japanese from 1941 until the end of the war, taking part in the desperate fighting on Timor in late 1941 and early 1942. It then took part in the defence of northern Australia, before going onto the offensive and carrying out a mix of reconnaissance missions and attack missions across the Dutch East Indies

No.1 Squadron (RAAF)

No.1 Squadron (RAAF) first saw action during the Second World War as a Lockheed Hudson squadron that was destroyed during the fighting in Malaya, Sumatra and Java. It was then reformed in Australia, and attacked Japanese targets first from Northern Austrian and then from Borneo.

Monday, August 13, 2012

Battle of Auerstädt (14 October 1806)

The battle of Auerstädt (14 October 1806) was the most important of two simultaneous French victories over the Prussians and saw Marshal Davoût with a single corps defeat the main body of the Prussian army while further south Napoleon with most of the Grand Armée defeated the smaller Prussian flank guard at Jena.

Battle of Schleiz (9 October 1806)

The battle of Schleiz (9 October 1806) was a minor clash early in the War of the Fourth Coalition and saw the French defeat an isolated detachment on the left of the Prussian army.

Thursday, August 09, 2012

No.15 Squadron, RAAF

No.15 Squadron, RAAF, was a Beaufort squadron that served as an anti-submarine and convoy escort unit from its formation in 1944 as well as sending a detachment to support the fighting on New Guinea.

No.10 Squadron, RAAF

No.10 Squadron, RAAF, flew with RAF Coastal Command for the entire duration of the Second World War, sinking six U-boats during that period.

No.9 Squadron (RAAF)

No.9 Squadron (RAAF) was responsible for the amphibious aircraft carried on the cruisers of the Royal Australian Navy. It was formed in January 1939 and was equipped with the Walrus.

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Scottish Lion on Patrol: 15th Scottish Reconnaissance Regiment, W. Kemsley, M.R. Riesco and T. Chamberlain.

Scottish Lion on Patrol: 15th Scottish Reconnaissance Regiment, W. Kemsley, M.R. Riesco and T. Chamberlain.

 Originally written in 1950 and updated in 2010 this book tells the tale of a wartime reconnaissance regiment from its formation, through the D-Day landings and on to the end of the war.
[read full review]

Who Goes Where?, Stella Rutter

Who Goes Where?, Stella Rutter.

A family history of the Broughton and Towler families combined with the autobiography of Stella Rutter, a member of the Supermarine drawing staff during the Second World War. Finishes with a collection of wartime memories from friends and colleagues.
[read full review]